Research on Malaria

Research on Malaria

World Malaria Day is celebrated every 25th April this year’s global campaign is with the theme: invest in the future, defeat malaria. World Malaria Day was instituted by WHO Member States during the 2007 World Health Assembly. It is an occasion to highlight the need for continued investment and sustained political commitment for malaria prevention and control. It is also an opportunity for new donors to join the global malaria partnership, and for research and academic institutions to showcase their scientific work.  KEY FACTS  Malaria is preventable and curable life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. In the year 2010, malaria caused where estimated at 660 000 deaths (with an uncertainty range of 490 000 to 836 000), mostly among African children.  Increased malaria prevention and control measures are dramatically reducing the malaria burden in many places. Non-immune travelers from malaria-free areas are very vulnerable to the disease when they get infected.  Malaria is caused by Plasmodium parasites that are spread to people through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes, called "malaria vectors", which bite mainly between dusk and dawn.  There are four parasite species that cause malaria in humans:  Plasmodium Falciparum  Plasmodium Vivax Plasmodium Malariae Plasmodium Ovale. Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are the most common. Plasmodium falciparum is the most deadly.  In recent years, some human cases of malaria have also occurred with Plasmodium knowlesi – a species that causes malaria among monkeys and occurs in certain forested areas of South-East Asia.  Who is at risk?  Approximately half of the world's population is at risk of malaria. Most malaria cases and deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa however, Asia, Latin America, and to a lesser extent the Middle East and parts of Europe are also affected. In 2011, 99 countries and territories had ongoing malaria transmission.  Specific population risk groups include:   Young Children in stable transmission areas who have not yet developed protective immunity against the most severe forms of the disease; Non-Immune Pregnant Women as malaria causes high rates of miscarriage and can lead to maternal death; Semi-Immune Pregnant Women in areas of high transmission. Malaria can result in miscarriage and low birth weight, especially during first and second pregnancies; Semi-56Immune HIV-infected pregnant women in stable transmission areas, during all pregnancies. Women with malaria infection of the placenta also have a higher risk of passing HIV infection to their newborns; People with HIV/AIDS; International travelers from non-endemic areas because they lack immunity; Immigrants from endemic areas and their children living in non-endemic areas and returning to their home countries to visit friends and relatives are similarly at risk because of waning or absent immunity. On 27th of April, 2013. the Community Leaders Patrol in colaboration with the National Youth Parliment conducted a cleansing exercise at Bakoteh along the water sream. Along the stream there was a lot of aquatic weeds along the stream and is a major breeding place for the mosquitoes. People along the stream appriciated the wonderful effort we did. Finally a major cleansing exercise on the preparation were we will expect one thousand youths, both form the Scouts, other youth Organisatios and the people in the community.      
Number of participants
50
Service hours
250
Topics
Personal safety